Sameera Reddy Opens Up About How She Tackled Postpartum Depression & Motherhood

From Deepika Padukone’s wise words on mental health to Sara Ali Khan’s battle with PCOD, Bollywood celebs have often come forward to discuss certain health concerns that were once considered ‘unspeakable’.

This time it is Sameera Reddy a doting mom to two kids, who has opened up about motherhood and postpartum depression. Reddy once ruled the box office with blockbusters like Race, De Dana Dan among others. But the bold actress
hit headlines for her empowering photoshoot flaunting her baby bump during her pregnancy, more recently.

After giving birth to her son Hans in 2015, Sameera welcomed her baby daughter earlier this year. When asked about the gap between both the pregnancies, Sameera told The Indian Express that after her first pregnancy, she suffered from postpartum depression and needed time to bounce back to normal.

“Honestly, I would have liked a shorter gap, but once Hans was born, I went through postpartum depression. It took me a little while to swing out of it,” Sameera said.

“Looking back, perhaps it worked out for the best as Hans is a sensitive child and I was able to give him enough time, prep him for the little one’s arrival. I don’t think he would have adjusted so well to Nyra if he were two,” she added.

The Taxi No. 9211 actress also shared that she took to therapy and medicinal help to cope up with her condition. “I think the first step to pulling yourself out, is to admit that there is a problem. As an actor, I was used to being in the limelight, staying svelte and slim, having a melee of people – spot boy, make-up artiste -around me. Suddenly I was out of shape, feeling exhausted and low. I’m a cheerful person otherwise,” she said.

“There is a big difference between baby blues and postpartum depression. I sought help in therapy, took homeopathy treatment and worked on myself. Cut to the present, the ease with which I confess to having experienced depression surprises many people as most are uncomfortable even admitting that they have experienced it. This needs to change”, she shared.

She also spoke in detail about what kind of a mother she is and the rules she has set to keep her family and kids happy and disciplined. “I have never had a nanny for my kids. I love bathing Nyra, enjoy doing everything for my children. It helps that my husband is a doting dad and extremely hands-on. He chips in tremendously before he leaves for work and after he returns in the evening,” she said.

“We eat breakfast and dinner at the table, all four of us, together with Nyra in her rocker. No television while eating; we chat, laugh, spend time together,” she added.

Speaking of the last time she shed a tear, Sameera said,

“Just days ago when my little baby girl smiled for the first time. I shed bucketfuls of tears! It was such an overwhelming, incredible experience.”

Sameera also shared a piece of advice for young mothers and said, “Enjoy your pregnancy, celebrate your bump. The idea of yummy mummies is a societal construct that you don’t have to conform to. Enjoy your own freedom, own your quirks.”

Once the child arrives, Sameera advises mothers to be stress-free. “Don’t get worked up by the ‘leftover’ weight or clothes that do not fit. Give yourself time. Never let yourself be judged by others, or pushed by others who will insist that you give a top feed to your baby at night to get him or her to sleep better. If you are lactating well, breastfeed. Follow your own instinct.”

She also shared the best part of being a mother and said, “It feels surreal that I have created a little life, a curious human who tells me “Chill, mom”, and explains to me how rain clouds are formed. It is a very curious, beautiful feeling.”

Life is never the same after becoming a mother. While motherhood changes every woman in imperceptible ways, there’s no shame in admitting one needs help or therapy to tackle postpartum depression.