Masaba Speaks Of Colourism & How Her Parents’ Relationship Impacted Her Childhood

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It’s 2020 and yet some people equate beauty with a person’s skin colour. And, while movements like ‘Black Lives Matter’ are bringing a positive change in society, many celebrities are also openly speaking about colourism and how it needs to end. Recently, designer and actor Masaba Gupta opened up about her experience of facing colour-based discrimination and her parents’ unconventional relationship.

Masaba, who is actor Neena Gupta and West Indian cricketer Vivian Richards’s daughter, said she faced her toughest times during her school days. In a recent interview, the actor said you need ‘a certain amount of grit and resolve to power through those moments’. She was quoted saying by HT,

 “It was reactions of friends and acquaintances, people who you thought had your back that affected me. A friend of mine brought up the colour of my skin every time I asked her about what to wear, what subject to study, or what sport I should play. I thought it was bizarre.”

She further added,

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“However, more than the colour of my skin, it was about the relationship of my parents. I remember being called a b*stard child a lot. Lots of boys in my school will ask ‘is she the ba**ard?’ I didn’t understand what it meant and I went and asked my mother when I was young and she explained it to me by the book. She said this is what it means and be prepared to get more of this.”

Talking about other cruel incidences from her growing up days she said,

“I played professional tennis in school and I was permitted to come late to the class as I was playing for the state. The boys in the class will open my bag, take out my underwear and toss it around. They would make fun of my shorts because I was a bigger girl. They would be like ‘is it all black inside from the colour of her skin’. You think you outgrow it but you don’t.”

This is harsh and no child should ever face this. It’s very important that as a society we become more inclusive and welcoming. What do you think? Tell us.

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