11 Witty Comebacks By Famous People In History That Are Still Impressive

Call these the famous insults of all time, or the quotes that hold sarcasm and wit in their truest form, famous people of the past sure knew their way with the words. We have got the likes of famous world leaders, the writers, and the warriors here who gave comebacks that became just as famous as they were.

1. One of the most feared military forces, Spartans sure knew their wit well. And when King Philip of Macedon decided to put pressure on them, this happened.

Image source
Image source

 

2. Who can beat the wit power of the famous author and humourist Mark Twain, who once said,

Image source
Image source

 

3. He who they call the Greatest Briton of all time, Winston Churchill was a winner of Nobel Prize in Literature. Of the MANY comebacks that he shot from the hip is this one in which he is referring to the British Labour politician, Sir Richard Stafford Cripps.

Image source
Image source

 

4. John Wilkes, the 18th century outspoken English journalist and politician once indulged in a famous dialogue exchange with the 4th Earl of Sandwich, John Montagu.

Image source
Image source

 

5. One of my most favourite lines dripping in intelligent wit by Mark Twain,

Image source
Image source

 

6. Abraham Lincoln, the man who led his country through Civil War, was once accused of being a two-faced by his opponent Douglas, during a debate. To his accusation, Lincoln replied,

Image source
Image source

 

7. Jimmy Carter was a Nobel Peace prize winner and the 39th President of the United States of America, who once said,

Image source
Image source

 

8. This conversation between the American poet, best known for her wisecracks, Dorothy Parker and a drunk man.

Image source
Image source

 

9. And this famous one in which Thomas Brackett Reed (a powerful leader of the US Republican party) shut Henry Clay (a Kentucky Congressman) up.

Image source
Image source

 

10. This conversation in which Sir Lewis Morris ‘bugged’ Oscar Wilde complaining how his books were being boycotted by the press.

Image source
Image source

 

11.  An American humourist Robert Benchley, leaving the Algonquin hotel one evening, came across a man in uniform, who he misconstrued to be a doorman. And what brew next was an awkward dialogue exchange, which Benchley turned in his favour.

Image source
Image source

Since words are immortal, why don’t we also make the most of them? 😉

Cover Image Source